my own private neverland

April 22, 2005 at 1:57 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

it doesn’t hurt to dream.

around the saddest circumstances, james barrie discovers the stuff of which better places are made of. he contends that against the bitterness, the travails, the loneliness of this plane of existence, it remains possible to find that place in which all you have to do is believe, and everything is right again.

a place where boys never grow up. a place where fairies blow pixie dust in your face and you can fly. a place of dwelling for pirates, indians, cowboys, dancing bears, and children of all ages.

in a world of deadlines, competition, paychecks, sex, drugs, intolerance, betrayals and other scandals, don’t we all want to find a place where our dreams are as easy to find as air?

in james barrie’s world, a failing marriage, plays that flopped and an inability to communicate his deepest, sharpest truth to an unwilling world didn’t bring him down. he channeled these energies into a positive outlet to bring an enduring tale about a boy who never grew up.

in the real world, boys do grow up. there is that exact moment in between boyhood and manhood, oftentimes indiscernable, when a choice is made, and one assumes a mantle of responsibility, or perhaps takes down a road where there is no turning back to the innocence of duties not yet realized.

this is the boyhood we must all nurture within. when against all that must be done, we still recognize what we want. how to take responsibility for our actions without taking everything so personally that we fail to realize that some things are not to be taken seriously. how to approach life with joy, despite, and maybe, even because of all the sorrow.

this is my neverland. and unless you’re michael jackson, i just might take you there someday.

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  1. o ayan vincent ha, i will finally react to your blog, partly to prove that i do read it.

    first of all, nice piece!

    second, just a thought — bakit ba we all always talk about boys not growing up? i think this is a sexist statement, an extremely sexist statement.

    instead of saying “a place where boys never grow up” cant we say “a place where girls never grow up”?…or instead of “in the real world, boys do grow up”, why not “in the real world, girls do grow up”?

    i know that boys even when they become men are not exactly deserving of the word “mature,” but i know a lot of women who are just as stupid…alam mo yon, mga babaeng pumapatol sa may asawa at nagpapabuntis pa, mga babaeng panay “ganda” lang pero “airhead” naman…

    (hay naku, dont get me started, coz some of these people are my friends hahah)

    anyways, i think part of the reason why we have a lot of men who leave behind their pregnant girlfriends, or men who are “afraid of commitment” (as women would put it when their partners would not marry them yet) is because society always reiterates to them that “boys never grow up” or “girls mature faster than boys” and other sickening versions of it.

    and because of that, boys are forced to act within this framework of “not growing up” or of “immaturity”…

    hay naku when you come to think of it, it’s mind-conditioning and traumatic di ba, to hear these things said around you all the time?

    for example, you, you had to take on a lot of responsbility in the family at quite an early age…that’s “being mature”…thats “growing up fast” di ba?

    or wait, would that be because youre g*y…??? chinky lang!!!!

  2. i know your sentiments only too well. but in keeping with what i have in my mind nowadays i wanted to focus on boys. you know how it is. so i’m sorry if girls feel left out, but i wanted this piece exactly to be about boys who never grow up. i can’t talk about girls at least as far as this piece is concerned simply because i don’t know girls. i only know boys. those who do grow up and those who can’t.


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